Take your course in our virtual classroom

We are all now dealing with the corona virus and the measures associated with it. Government guidelines also have consequences for our training courses. Unfortunately, at the moment we are no longer able to organise face-to-face sessions with trainers. 

Fortunately, we are able to offer a good alternative in the form of BigBlueButton. With this tool you will receive training as usual, but then online and broken up into different sessions. By doing this we can take into account the student’s maximum attention span. This also means more frequent contact with the trainer, allowing more opportunities to ask questions, and in this way students can spread their work with the course content over different moments. All this ensures that information received during the course is better retained.

akteos online training

How does the virtual classroom work?  

BigBlueButton is an online tool where the trainer can teach ‘live’ to individuals and groups. We are currently offering this tool free of charge to replace face-to-face sessions so that students do not lose momentum in their learning and new courses do not need to be postponed.

Students log in using an online platform and can participate in the training using their webcam. BigBlueButton offers many ways to allow lessons to progress effectively, enabling us to continue to offer our clients the quality they are accustomed to from a distance.

BigBlueButton offers many ways to allow lessons to progress effectively, enabling us to continue to offer our clients the quality they are accustomed to from a distance.

In the tool documents or screens can be shared and ‘live’ notes can be made on a whiteboard. In addition, students can chat with each other and the trainer during the session to ask questions or clarify things. They can even work together in smaller groups in break out rooms within the tool. The training can also be recorded so that students  can watch it again later.

Want to know more about our virtual classroom? Watch this tutorial.

Do you have any questions?

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or would like to talk about the possibilities. We are happy to help! Send us a message through our contact page or call us on 088 – 02 88 070

Ask the specialist: Why are the Poles so formal?

I was asked this question during one of my recent follow up meetings with a British client named Michael: Why are the Poles so formal? Perhaps they do not trust me? Michael assumed that this was the case, but in the end it wasn’t, which costs a lot of time to find out and repair. What can you do in the future?

More reserverd
The Poles are generally more formal and reserved at the first meeting than other nations. When I was studying at University of Chester I was astonished when a professor of employment law was allowing students to address him per “you” or “Phil” which would be impossible back in Poland where you had to refer lecturers in a very formal manner.

In initial business contacts Polish people address each other quite formally as they use the person’s courtesy titles like Pan [Mr], Pani [Mrs] followed by a surname or first name. Usually, after two or three meetings, the use of first names is welcomed. Do not worry if this is not the case. Some people are just accustomed to using titles and do this routinely.

Formality is used to respect status
I suggest you use “Ty” [ You – informal ] with family, friends and children. However, use the formal “Pan”and “Pani” with everyone else.
The most difficult thing with this approach is to figure out who is a friend and who is not. The Polish word for “friend” describes a more intimate relationship than in other cultures.

Don’t assume that just because your Polish contact uses less formal language to address you gives you permission to use it to address him, especially if they’re older than you. Polish society is quite hierarchical and formality is used to respect status. Therefore, think of it this way – you have to call the King “Your Majesty”, but he can call you whatever he likes.

To sum up
In professional situations, the Poles are polite and formal, requiring the use of formal forms of address and certain forms of etiquette which should be respected for a first meeting. Do you want to learn more? Take a look at our courses or in specific our countrycourse about Poland

In the beginning they appear quite distant but if you are kind and open, relationships soon become warmer.


About the author: Wojciech Kolodziejczak

Wojciech’s mission is to promote cross-cultural networking and to educate professionals that building strong business relations can help them grow their careers, businesses and personal lives.

He is a business trainer specialised in cross-cultural communication, networking, and negotiation skills for British, Polish, and other international businesses. He is also a visiting lecturer on cross-cultural networking skills for the Federation of Small Businesses, London Metropolitan University and other organisations.

More info about Wojciech: www.lifenetworker.com

 

Cultural Responses to the coronavirus | an example from America

Since the coronavirus spread outside the Chinese borders it has become a pandemic. As a result, it has demanded the attention and immediate action of almost every country in the world. How countries deal with a crisis like this differs per country and per culture. 

When you look more closely at the nature of the governments’ policies, the ways in which they are communicated to the public and the transparency of the communication, it becomes clear that these approaches are all culturally determined. 

How does your country deal with the government’s measures and approaches to COVID-19?

This week we will discuss the effects of cultural dimensions on the corona crisis in America. A special thanks to our American expert and trainer Lisa Ross-Marcus who co-created this article with me.

America – A culture that values ‘I’ over ‘We’

Different policies per state

America is divided into 50 states and there has been no unified national plan to control the pandemic in the USA. The 50 states have each been left to devise their own strategies, competing for scarce protective gear and medical supplies among themselves while leaving the public confused by conflicting information.

Culture and corona in America, the effect of culture on handling a crisis like the corona virus. Individualism.
Map of the 50 states of the United States of America.

Lack of social safety nets 

In a culture that values the ‘I’ over the ‘We’ there is not a strong emphasis on social safety nets. Consequently, it is not a given that everyone has access to health care and sufficient unemployment benefits. This has drastically increased the number of coronavirus cases in the USA because many people cannot afford to seek medical care when they need it. They have been forced to continue working and spreading the virus, just to be able to pay their bills.

Protests against the lock down 

Despite the soaring numbers of Covid-19 cases, many Americans have rejected the notion that the government can order them to stay indoors and to shut down their businesses. When it comes down to wearing protective masks, many feel it is their fundamental right to make their own choice. 

In some places, like the state of Michigan, these passions have run so high that people took to the streets in protest. Many brandished their (legally owned) guns in front of the state capitol building and clamored to be ‘liberated’ from the tyranny of the state governor, who decreed that the state should remain on lock-down for everyone’s safety. 

Protest on corona virus lockdown in America. Stop the tyranny. Open Michigan. Freedom is valued greatly in the individualist culture of America.
Source (the New York Times) 

America in relation to the dimension of individualism

American culture places a strong value on individualism. This means that people prefer a loosely knit social framework in which people are free to pursue their own goals and are only expected to take care of themselves and their immediate families (Hofstede). Individual rights are deeply cherished, so it’s not surprising that many Americans have interpreted strict lockdown measures as a threat to their freedom.

With the exception of the heroism of healthcare and other essential workers, it is the strong cultural focus on the individual instead of the group which created some resistance to unifying the country behind the idea of personal sacrifice for the common good. 

The recent nationwide protests in response to the police killing of George Floyd, highlighting the Black Lives Matter movement have shaken up many of these ideas. There is currently a surge in solidarity among Americans (which has fanned out globally), to fight for an inclusive society where responsibility for the well-being of all is a shared goal. It will be interesting to see how this movement could create a cultural shift in American life in the long term.

Become a culture expert yourself

Would you like to know more about effective behavior in international business settings such as America? Check our country or expat courses here.

Also read: 

Cultural responses to the coronavirus | An example from China

Since the coronavirus spread outside the Chinese borders it has become a pandemic. As a result, it has demanded the attention and immediate action of almost every country in the world. How countries deal with a crisis like this differs per country and per culture.

When you look more closely at the nature of the governments’ policies, the ways in which they are communicated to the public and the transparency of the communication, it becomes clear that these approaches are all culturally determined. 

How does your country deal with the government’s measures and approaches to COVID-19?

This week we will discuss the effects of cultural dimensions on the corona crisis in China. A special thanks to our sinologist and trainer Lilian, who co-created this article.

China – Mixed messages from the top 

Wuhan, where it all started

At the beginning of the year, the coronavirus first emerged in Wuhan city. The country proved to be swift and skillful when putting virtually the whole country into lock-down. The Chinese government poured billions into society to build a number of new emergency hospitals. They also developed technologies that could aid detection of the virus and help control mass surveillance.

Strict measures 

No one (depending on region or city) was allowed to leave their homes. If someone was detected as having the virus, the whole apartment building could be cordoned off. Tests, travel history, temperatures, health checks and the use of contact tracing technology were used to systematically find and isolate infected people. 

Culture and corona. China responds to corona by detecting fever.

Although this is an intrusive approach, there was an exceptionally high degree of understanding and acceptance of such measures (WHO) by the population. A degree of acceptance that cannot be as easily achieved in all cultures, as we will see in the article about America next week.

The effect of hierarchy and power

Before the lock-down was in place, several doctors in Wuhan had already sounded alarm bells that something was seriously wrong. Rather than paying attention to their warnings, local leaders arrested them and made them publicly admit to having spread false rumors. 

When one of these doctors (Doctor Li Wenliang) died as a result of the virus, Chinese anger about the cover up started to spill over onto social media. 

The connection with cultural dimensions

China has a strong collectivist culture which means that people have a preference for a tightly-knit framework in society. Individuals expect their relatives or members of a particular in-group to look after them and they provide their unquestioning loyalty in return (Hofstede). 

In times like these, you can clearly see the preference of the Chinese by looking at the high rate of acceptance and obedience to the rules and measures imposed by the government. You can also see it in the nature of the measures taken; they show little concern for privacy or individual autonomy. 

China scores high on power distance

Furthermore, it is visible that the Chinese exhibit the cultural dimension of power distance to a considerable degree. They accept the hierarchical order in which everybody has a place and this does not require further justification. More specifically, they accept and expect that power is distributed unequally. 

Hierarchy or power distance is a cultural dimension on which China scores highly. Influence of hierarchy and power on the discovery of corona.

The high degree of power distance is clearly shown by the fact that Doctor Li Wenliang was arrested and forced to publicly admit to spreading false rumors. However, when the government did not listen to the warnings of the doctor(s) and this information came out, people reacted with anger. This reaction is something that you would not expect in a collectivist society that places a high value on hierarchy. 

Interestingly, even though Chinese culture is characterized by a high degree of power, the government responded by issuing a formal apology to the relatives of Li Wenliang. This example indicates the complexity of culture and shows that numerous factors can have an impact which can lead to different behavior than you might expect. 

Become a cultural expert yourself

Would you like to know more about effective behaviour in international business settings like China? Check our country or expat courses here.

Also read:

Ask the Specialist: Why don’t the British just say what they mean?

 
QUIT BEATING AROUND THE BUSH AND SAY WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND

If you have ever found yourself in the United Kingdom trying to understand your British colleagues who gave you a strange answer or you cannot put your finger on what was going on, then this article is for you.

Our consultant Wojciech Kolodziejczak explains:

“Yes, it was too much!!! I remember saying that to my British manager a couple of years ago as he talked about lots of unimportant things and did not want to tell me directly what (is) was the problem.”

The origin of the phrase 
‘Beating about the bush or the American version: Beating around the bush’ goes back to medieval age when it was customary to beat the bushes during the bird hunts so that the birds were so frightened by the noise that they flew up into the air and therefore could be seen and captured by the huntsmen. Today the idiom has moved away from its original meaning of being a prelude to the main event, to its current meaning of ‘to evade’, ‘to avoid’ or ‘to speak in a roundabout way’.

High context
The British are quite indirect communicators; they deeply avoid creating conflicts. Therefore you should not take everything British say literally, as the combination of politeness, double meanings and understatements can make it seem like they are saying the opposite of what they are actually thinking. 

A few examples:

  • That’s one way of putting it’ can be a polite way of saying ‘This idea is ridiculous’
  • ‘I only have a few minor comments’ could be a respectful way of communicating ‘Please rewrite completely’, whereas you understood it as ‘He has found a few typos’.

The British culture is a high context culture, therefore words are not enough. You will have to read between the lines to understand what they really mean. You have to know the background and context to understand the message and interpret tone, expression and non-verbal communication.

When asked, ‘How are you?’ the only appropriate answer is along the lines of, ‘Fine, thanks.  You should not go into detail about any problems you go through. When British friend greets you with, ‘Hi – are you all right? ‘ you can answer with, ‘Yes, thank you’, or simply say, ‘Y’all right?’ back, as it really just means hello.

More helpful tips:


About the author: Wojciech Kolodziejczak
Wojciech’s mission is to promote cross-cultural networking and to educate professionals that building strong business relations can help them grow their careers, businesses and personal lives.

He is a business trainer specialised in cross-cultural communication, networking, and negotiation skills for British, Polish, and other international businesses. He is also a visiting lecturer on cross-cultural networking skills for the Federation of Small Businesses, London Metropolitan University and other organisations.

More info about Wojciech: www.lifenetworker.com

The challenges of international management

Managing a virtual team

Does your team work all over the world and in different time zones? For example, the technicians are located in India, the project leaders in Germany, France and the US, and the manager, i.e. you, in the Netherlands. If this is the case, you are possibly working together daily, but have never all met in person.  

Different backgrounds and languages within a team may lead to misunderstandings – maybe even serious ones. To create a sense of solidarity within an international team is challenging, but also key to achieving a successful  collaboration. So, how to go about it?

The advantages
Quite often it is only the disadvantages of long-distance management that are discussed, but if we are prepared to change management methods, there are undoubtedly advantages:

  • Working internationally stimulates flexibility and increases availability. If the work is divided among people in different time zones, a project can be worked on 24/7.
  • Working virtually is a good cost-saving method, particularly where travel expenses are concerned.
  • If bridging cultural differences is successful, working with different cultures is both motivating and enriching. It offers the opportunity to share best practices, to discover new working methods, and to expand personal insights.

The challenges
Managing a virtual team is a challenge. Communication is more difficult because of the different languages involved and the lack of personal contact and non-verbal communication. This leads to a more extended and less noticeable risk of misunderstandings than would be the case in traditional teams and may result in conflict.

Because of the distance it may be hard to create a sincere team spirit with reciprocal support, friendships and connections. Team members may feel isolated or frustrated. Therefore it is of the utmost importance that they are independent and able to motivate themselves.

Four tips and keys to success

It should always be kept in mind that managing a team from afar is harder than managing a traditional team. Also remember that, although new principles have been put in place, old habits die hard. Motivating people to achieve a communal goal and building trust are therefore of crucial importance. But how to do this?

  1. Adjusting management style
    In some cultures people expect their managers to have direct control, which is impossible in international management. In the Netherlands and Scandinavia, for example, the management role is one of facilitator. This working method is not suitable for virtual teams either and may lead to misunderstanding and incorrect interpretation.
    The ideal situation consists of the right balance between these two management styles , where a manager takes the lead and inspires trust, but also trusts others to delegate to co-workers.
  2. Giving attention to communication style
    In order to manage international teams effectively, an explicit communication style is what is required. The manager should explain everything clearly and in detail. It is key that everyone understands what the common goals are, what tasks need to be executed, who does what, who needs to be informed, by whom, how often, and how.
    To avoid confusion the manager is therefore obliged to give perfectly straightforward instructions.
  3. Guiding cultural differences
    When dealing with a multicultural virtual team, most likely another issue will surface: notions about time, hierarchy, dealing with conflict, communication, etc., may vary culturally.
    When a German project leader sets his or her Indian team members a deadline for software delivery, he or she should be aware of all cultural factors that may put meeting the deadline at risk. Something that works well in one culture could be seen as inappropriate in another. As these differences may lead to misunderstanding and irritation, it is important to acquire knowledge about the team members’ cultures and come to mutual agreement on working methods. After all, the objective is to execute the project collaboratively and to create among team members a kind of common culture based on synergy and contribution.
    Taking into account cultural differences, new rules should be drawn up regarding: Decision making, Communication style and method, Deadline management, Feedback.
    The possible consequences of non-compliance with these rules should also be clearly stated. As working interculturally does not leave any room for doubts, it has to be obvious who has which role. With everyone aware of the rules,  it is up to the manager to check if they are actually followed.
  4. Organizing virtual meetings
    Even if everything seems to be progressing nicely, having regular video conferences is essential to team building. The manager should focus on what is going well and aim for a positive team spirit. Group achievements could and should be celebrated. These virtual meetings should offer opportunities to share experiences and discuss problems. They could also simply serve as a possibility to have a chat, just as traditional team members have their water cooler conversations. All this will be in aid of creating a group sense and providing a stable working relationship. When team member know each other better, even though they are unable to meet in person, it will result in more trust, a true team spirit, and greater success.

About the author – Marietta Lenz 
Since 1990, Marietta has lived and worked in several countries. Her home is now in the Netherlands, but she also frequently works in Germany, Belgium and other European countries.

After graduating she started her professional career as a trainer of Russian, business German, and cultural awareness. In the meantime she has become a well-respected and experienced consultant, specialized in intercultural management, leadership and personal development.

Ask the specialist: Why don’t the British just say what they mean?

Quit beating around the bush and say what’s on your mind

If you have ever found yourself in the United Kingdom trying to understand your British colleagues who gave you a strange answer or you cannot put your finger on what was going on, then this article is for you.

Our consultant Wojciech Kolodziejczak explains:

“Yes, it was too much!!! I remember saying that to my British manager a couple of years ago as he talked about lots of unimportant things and did not want to tell me directly what (is) was the problem.”

The origin of the phrase
‘Beating about the bush or the American version: Beating around the bush’ goes back to medieval age when it was customary to beat the bushes during the bird hunts so that the birds were so frightened by the noise that they flew up into the air and therefore could be seen and captured by the huntsmen. Today the idiom has moved away from its original meaning of being a prelude to the main event, to its current meaning of ‘to evade’, ‘to avoid’ or ‘to speak in a roundabout way’.

High context
The British are quite indirect communicators; they deeply avoid creating conflicts. Therefore you should not take everything British say literally, as the combination of politeness, double meanings and understatements can make it seem like they are saying the opposite of what they are actually thinking. 

A few examples:

  • That’s one way of putting it’ can be a polite way of saying ‘This idea is ridiculous’
  • ‘I only have a few minor comments’ could be a respectful way of communicating ‘Please rewrite completely’, whereas you understood it as ‘He has found a few typos’.

The British culture is a high context culture, therefore words are not enough. You will have to read between the lines to understand what they really mean. You have to know the background and context to understand the message and interpret tone, expression and non-verbal communication.

When asked, ‘How are you?’ the only appropriate answer is along the lines of, ‘Fine, thanks.  You should not go into detail about any problems you go through. When British friend greets you with, ‘Hi – are you all right? ‘ you can answer with, ‘Yes, thank you’, or simply say, ‘Y’all right?’ back, as it really just means hello.

More helpful tips:


About the author: Wojciech Kolodziejczak
Wojciech’s mission is to promote cross-cultural networking and to educate professionals that building strong business relations can help them grow their careers, businesses and personal lives.

He is a business trainer specialised in cross-cultural communication, networking, and negotiation skills for British, Polish, and other international businesses. He is also a visiting lecturer on cross-cultural networking skills for the Federation of Small Businesses, London Metropolitan University and other organisations.

More info about Wojciech: www.lifenetworker.com

Ask the specialist: Does small talk make sense?

Small Talk or Big Talk

The British are world champions in small talk. One of our training participant asked us: ‘What is the purpose of small talk? To me it sounds like a waste of time’

Hence the question: Does small talk make sense at all? 

Our consultant Wojciech Kolodziejczak explains: 

The small talk is actually a very powerful tool and it has a goal of breaking the ice and bringing people together. It is indispensable at every contact – both during the first meeting and during subsequent meetings (even during negotiations!). 

  1. It is a tool used to break the ice, loosen up the situation and find things we have in common. Once you have established at least one common interest you can focus on that for a while to get to know the person better.
  2. Helps to relax – Meeting people at business meetings can be very stressful and small talk helps you and the other person to relax.
  3. People buy people, not their products, and small talk is a great opportunity to check who we are dealing with and whether there is any “synergy” and potential to build a good and lasting relationship.
  4. It makes it easier to stay away from emotional subjects like politics, religion and other topics that could “build a wall” between people.
  5. Gather facts – In a very non-intrusive way you can gather interesting facts ( like hobbies and interests etc. ) about the other person. People appreciate when you listen and show interest in them.
  6. People feel more comfortable if their views and beliefs are not being questioned or evaluated.
  7. Know – Like – Trust – With small talk you are not trying to “sell them anything” which is a great way of starting “KNOW-LIKE-TRUST” process. It sounds like we should call it: BIG TALK

A great example is Queen Elizabeth, who often asks her guests during the audience:

  • Queen Elizabeth: “Have you come from far?”
  • The Guest: “Your Majesty, I have travelled from Manchester”
  • Queen Elizabeth: “I really enjoyed my last trip to Manchester several years ago…”

The principle is simple – she speaks about things, places known to the guest. She talks about the place or asks questions about it. Then, she listens to the answers and follow up on those subjects she can explore further. She is looking for common ground or interests that they can chat about and start to build rapport.

Avoid taboo topics such as religion, politics and immigration, and earnings.
Let’s look for what unites us, not what divides us.


About the author: Wojciech Kolodziejczak
Wojciech is an International Business Developer, Cross-cultural Networker and Public Speaker. His mission is to promote cross-cultural networking and to educate professionals that building strong business relations can help them grow their careers, businesses and personal lives. I have been advising small businesses and corporate clients about business development and marketing opportunities in the UK and Poland. I have been also assisting migrant businesses as a speaker and business trainer specialized in cross-cultural networking and business development.

More about Wojchiech: www.lifenetworker.com

Working with the Japanese

 

4 ‘rituals’ to make a smooth welcome for your Japanese business relations

Risk-averse, hierarchy, apply-rules, indirect, attention to the details, conflict avoidance…. These are some of the general Japanese characteristics that are embedded in their subconscious mind, influencing their behaviours.

Some are quite an opposite to the Dutch and I receive tons of questions about the Japanese business culture. Today, I share some Japanese business “rituals” that will be handy to know when you are welcoming your Japanese business relations to your office.

1. Ritual of Preparation 準備

Preparation for any action is considered highly important by the Japanese, as it contributes to an immaculate result and success of any performance or action. The Japanese invest ample time and energy for preparation, from wearing Kimono, making Sushi to conducting business!  

Preparation helps their risk-averse nature. Good preparation would avoid making mistakes and pitfalls.  The Japanese will do utmost to be well-organized, on time and prepared for the visit. They would request for the information and details related to the topic of meetings and a thought-through schedule of the day. Business agility is what many professionals opt for in this era of digital transformation. Japanese style of preparation may seem too much burden or even a destruction to your routine. But by responding timely to their request, you will save much time to do business with them later. Laying a good foundation for later business.

TIP: Always it is appreciated to provide extra information such as your company culture, dress code in the office(formal, informal), surroundings (sightseeing possibility? ) and the weather. So there will be no surprises and have an idea what to expect!

2. Ritual of Greeting 挨拶

You may have heard millions of times about “Japanese business card rituals”, dedicating some moments to introduce themselves by presenting and receiving a business card in two hands, accompanied by a light bowing and some silent moments too.  It is beautiful as they do with our full attention and good intention and we all feel the good vibe during this ceremonial exchange.

Not only because it is a highly appreciative “business manner” in Japan, but it is also the momentum of an opportunity for anyone from any cultural background to connect from your heart, and build trust in a matter of a minute or so. The Japanese, treat business cards with respect, as an extension of ourselves which has our name, position, company are stated. If you don’t carry your business card, that is OK, but take a good respectable moment to receive business cards and introduce yourself. 

TIP: It is an instant mindful moment that you can benefit from and connect to your self first and connect to the others. This ritual of greeting is a  “Trust at First Sight” moment and seeding for a good relationship.

3. Ritual of Meals 食事

From breakfast, lunch to dinner,  from a small simple dish to a gourmet dinner, Japanese take much pleasure and appreciation to have a meal.  It is quality over quantity.  It can be a quick meal, but something that we can look forward. For lunch, in Japan, we enjoy “Bento box lunch” with rice and artfully arranged small portions of meat, fish, and vegetable.  It is an art of foods. 

We will not take a long lunch and a one-hour lunch break is normal.  When your Japanese business relations are on a visit to your office, they would probably be looking forward to lunch and are curious to try out the local specialty. 

TIP: Please do remember the importance of taking time for a meal. Eating together and sharing your food culture is the moment you can make bonding with the Japanese.

4. Ritual of Souvenir お土産

Art of giving a gift is an important part of Japanese culture, especially bringing a souvenir on a visit.  It is a gesture of appreciation and gratitude of any stage of relationships. 

In a business relationship, it is likely that the Japanese bring a small token of gift, something like beautifully wrapped cookies that can be shared in your office. Ask permission to open it, and unwrap the paper gently and never roughly tear it, as the wrapping is also a part of the gift and treat it gently.

TIP: From your office, you could also prepare a small gift, a box of cookies or chocolate, your local specialty as a souvenir to their visit and a token of starting or deepening your business relationship.


About the author: Azumi Uchitani

Azumi is a Japanese national, having spent half of her life in Europe (UK, Ireland, France, Netherlands) with over 20 years of experience in cross-border business development and post-merger integration at leading global companies.

he helps management teams to deal with the Japanese – European cultural differences and make a positive outcome, through seminars, inter-cultural training (among others for Akteos), and coaching sessions. She is also known as an inspirational speaker and teacher and spoken at several times TEDx, bringing Japanese mindfulness to business and life.

More info about Azumi: https://www.azumiuchitani.com/

 

Christmas around the world – Celebrate something new

 

 

Six most remarkable Christmas traditions 

While Christmas may have begun solely as a Christian holiday, and is often still celebrated as such, people from all over the world have embraced the festive season and added their own traditions along the way. Smiley snowmen, lush christmas trees and Santa Claus still reign supreme. But if you look close enough you will discover some very different takes on December’s most famous day.

 

1. Japan: KFC Christmas dinner

Back in 1974, the American fast-food restaurant KFC released a festive marketing campaign in Japan. The seemingly simple slogan “Kurisumasu ni wa kentakkii!” (Kentucky for Christmas!) spawned a national tradition that still thrives to this day. Although Christmas is not even a national holiday in Japan, families from all over the country head to their local KFC for a special Christmas Eve meal.
Learn more: Country course Japan 

2. Venezuela: Roller Skate Mass

On Christmas morning city dwellers of the Venezuelan capital of Caravas make their way to mass on roller skates. This unique tradition is so popular that roads across the city are closed to cars so that people can skate to church in safety, before heading home for the less-than-traditional Christmas dinner of ‘tamales’ (a wrap made out of cornmeal dough and stuffed with meat, then steamed).

3. Germany: Pickle in the Tree

The Christmas tree tradition embraced around the world today is believed to have started in Germany back in the 16th Century, so it comes as no surprise that they still have some funny customs relating to the festive trees. One of these is to hide a pickle somewhere within the branches of the tree, and give a gift to whichever child in the household finds it.

Some claim that the tradition may not be German after-all. One legend says that the Christmas pickle originated in Spain when two young boys were held as prisoners inside a pickle barrel. Saint Nicholas rescued the boys and brought them back to life. Either way, a pickle on the Christmas tree is a tradition we can totally get behind. Learn more: Country course Germany  

4. Canada: The mailbox of Santa Claus

Did you know that Santa Claus has his own postal address? His mailbox is in Canada and if you write him a letter before December 16, you will get one back. In more than thirty possible languages, including Braille. Send your letter to Santa Claus, North Pole H0H 0H0, Canada. It’s free and you do not need a stamp, because Santa Claus is just great. Just like the postcode of the North Pole.

5. Norway: Flying Witches and brooms

In Norway, brooms and mops are hidden during Christmas. Not because people do not feel like cleaning up, but because the Norwegians are a little superstitious. The tradition dates back to the days when people thought that witches and evil spirits would come through the chimney during Christmas. To this day, many people still hide their brooms in the safest place in the house to prevent them from being stolen for a ‘joyride’.

6. Russia: 12-course dinner

The Orthodox Church follows the Julian Calendar for religious holidays, so Christmas is celebrated in Russia on January 7. Many people fast until Christmas dinner arrives. It is only when the first stars appear in the sky on Christmas Eve that food can be eaten again. And not just: a 12-course dinner, meant to honor the 12 apostles.
Learn more: Country course Russia


About our Country courses

Doing business and/or working in an international environment not only requires expertise but above all the ability to adapt. Especially as each country has a different way of thinking about hierarchy, showing emotions during business discussions, time management and the need, or not, to reach consensus.

Bridge cultural differences
Insight in your own cultural profile is the startingpoint of our trainings. 

The Akteos Country – and Cultural Awareness courses will help you to be succesful in an international setting and communicate effectively, have successful meetings and negotiations with your new business partners.